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Facts About Holocaust

 

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NAZI and the Jews

NAZI and the Jews
By Sharon White

Christianity became the main religion of Europe in the 4th century, thus Judaism became hated by everyone on the simple basis that it “killed Jesus Christ�? This is how Anti-Semitism originated in Europe, and stayed there all the way through to the 20th century. Jewish extermination In Spain in 1400s, Russian “pogroms�?in the 19th century. Hitler picked up this trend and perfected it, spreading anti-Semitic hatred to the rest of the world.

Jewish business and professionalism had been very successful in Germany after 1871 due to German Jews gaining civil rights making jealousy and anti-Semitic hatred increase in Germany especially amongst the white-collar workers. Hence, a popular political policy since 1918 has been anti-Semitic policies. The Jews became the focus for every problem of Weimar Germany, i.e. inflation, unemployment, economic weakness and the treaty of Versailles.

When Hitler came to power in 1933, his anti-Semitic policy/aims were indecisive except he wanted them removed from German society explained in his book, Mein Kampf. There was no direct hint towards the creation of extermination camps. The evolution of the Final Solution in regards to the Jewish question involved a number of stages.

Between 1933 �?37, certain government legislations were passed withdrawing civil rights from Jews leading a mass exodus of Jews from Germany. The first Nazi racial law that was passed (April 1933) was the categorising Jews as “non-Aryans�? stripping Jews from a number of civil rights including the prohibition of working in civil service, the army and other professions. In that same month, Jewish businesses were boycotted with the aim of making the move permanent. However, economic weakness and foreign pressure caused it to last for a single day.

The formalising of Nazi anti-Semitic law was enacted under the Nuremberg Laws on 15 September 1935. Hitler chose the most moderate version of the Nuremberg Laws and wrote up the conditions that made people eligible to be affected by them, which was basically any person with a direct or indirect connection to a Jew. The second major law was “For the Protection of German Blood and German Honour�? which prohibited marriage between Germans and Jews, resulting in the abolishment of Jewish political rights, defining Jews as non-citizens. The Nuremberg Laws made Jews officially second-class citizens.

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