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Facts About Holocaust

 

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When historical, economic and social contexts are viewed separately and in conjunction with each other, skin color remains a stigma, despite advances made over the last hundred years – end of slavery, success of the Civil Rights movement and implementation of affirmative action to redress past ills, especially in the education (in 1990 1 out of every 8 college students was black versus the 1 out of every 20 figure in 1964) and employment sectors (from 1970 to 2000, the number of black doctors doubled and number of black lawyers and engineers tripled). With affirmative action currently under attack, the negative relationship between skin color and self-esteem (the darker the skin, the lower the self-esteem) and continued racial discrimination and perceptions of such discrimination, feelings of low self-worth and inferiority remain deeply ingrained in African American society, adversely impacting the psyche, freedom, and ultimately the true potential of blacks per se. In fact, it remains so bad in some sectors that sociologists view black relationships in four contexts: Cash Connection (in which mothers tell their daughters to look for someone who can “take care of them” in lieu of love), Flesh Connection (the pursuit of sex for self-gratification without regard to love and potential consequences such as unexpected pregnancies and contraction of sexually-transmitted diseases), Force Connection (acts of domination by one partner, predominantly the male, to subvert the other, usually the female), and Dependency Connection (the “logical and inevitable result of others,” in which a woman is “transformed into a commodity, reduced to parts of her body and physically or ideologically” molded into a compliant state to such a degree that she loses her independence and even remains in a bad relationship filled with threats, violence and infidelity).[15] At the same time, black society also discourages social advancement through criticism and stereotyping – “…we have continued to pass judgment on each other… it is not fair to criticize black people – ‘they are trying to be white’ – who want to move out of rural, urban or ghetto areas for the betterment of their personal future… to provide a better life for their children… whose vocabulary lacks certain slang [and who work] hard [and] take advantage of education,” Shavon Reed wrote in “Defining Blacks.”[16] Not surprisingly, when viewed through this prism, only 48% of blacks indicated that there had been progress in ending discrimination since the success of the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s, according to a 2000 New York Times Poll.[17]

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